Faculty Publications

Title

Curvilinear performance effects of social cyberloafing out of class: the mediating role as a recovery experience

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Effort-recovery model, Job demands–resources model, Psychological detachment, Recovery experience, Social cyberloafing

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Information Technology and People

Volume

34

Issue

2

First Page

581

Last Page

598

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether Chinese college students' social cyberloafing out of class has a curvilinear effect on academic performance and whether students' levels of psychological detachment and relaxation mediate the effect. Design/methodology/approach: A field survey was used to collect 502 self-reported responses from student Internet users at a large university located in central China. Findings: The results show an inverted U-shaped relationship between social cyberloafing out of class and academic performance. Two types of effort recovery experience gained from social cyberloafing, psychological detachment and relaxation, mediate that effect. Students' social cyberloafing out of class is positively associated with psychological detachment and relaxation, which in turn, have opposite effects on academic performance. Practical implications: This study offers novel insights into the effects of social cyberloafing on college students' academic achievement. The findings illustrate how social cyberloafing can serve as a recovery experience and improve academic performance, but it can hinder performance if the cyberloafing is excessive. Originality/value: This study extends the cyberloafing literature by focusing on Chinese college students' cyberloafing out of class. The study finds that a moderate amount of social cyberloafing out of class can result in psychological detachment, relaxation and improved performance when returning to academic work. However, both too much or too little social cyberloafing can result in difficulty returning to academic work and reduced academic performance. The findings are novel to the cyberloafing literature.

Department

Department of Accounting

Original Publication Date

3-12-2021

DOI of published version

10.1108/ITP-03-2019-0105

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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