Faculty Publications

Title

Maintaining residential normalcy through self-initiated assimilative and accommodative coping while aging-in-place

Document Type

Article

Keywords

accommodative coping, Aging-in-place, assimilative coping, personal adaptation, residential normalcy

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Housing and Society

Volume

44

Issue

1-2

First Page

22

Last Page

40

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of aging-in-place from the perspective of the oldest-old who are experiencing it. The consequences of several converging conditions were explored: a fervent desire to remain at home until life’s end, the natural progressive decline related to aging, and the adaptiveness that is intrinsically inherent in human functioning. This study explored the adaptations that elders themselves initiated in response to ever-declining abilities and limitations associated with age while remaining in the same long-occupied home. Interviews were conducted with 10 participants between 88 and 100 years of age to yield rich, person-centered, and contextualized data about their experiences and means of coping. All were widowed and living alone, and the duration of occupancy within their present home ranged from 43 to 68 years. This long tenure within their place of residence allowed for an analysis of behavioral and attitude adjustments in response to aging and physical decline over time. Building theory grounded in data, the research findings elucidated the remarkably adaptive nature of older people over time and revealed a specific progression to the particular types of adaptations which were utilized.

Original Publication Date

5-4-2017

DOI of published version

10.1080/08882746.2017.1389560

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

Share

COinS