Faculty Publications

Title

The interactive role of eating regulation and stress in the prediction of weight-related outcomes among college students

Document Type

Article

Keywords

body fat, body mass index, college students, eating regulation, stress

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Stress and Health

Volume

34

Issue

1

First Page

59

Last Page

71

Abstract

The interactive role of eating regulation and perceived stress on weight-related outcomes was examined among 319 sophomore year college students (110 males and 209 females). Moderated regressions were used to examine interactions between stress and eating regulation on study outcomes including body mass index (BMI) and body fat. Eating regulation moderated associations between stress and BMI and body fat outcomes. Students reporting high perceived stress, high autonomous eating regulation, low controlled regulation, and low amotivation exhibited higher outcomes (BMI and body fat) than those with similar eating regulation but lower perceived stress. Students with lower autonomous eating regulation and higher controlled regulation had no differences in study outcomes across levels of stress. College students who regulate their eating behaviours for health reasons (specifically showing autonomous regulation) exhibit higher BMI and body fat when they report higher levels of perceived stress. Health promotion programs for college students need to target education efforts towards stress reduction and healthy eating behaviours.

Original Publication Date

2-1-2018

DOI of published version

10.1002/smi.2760

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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