Faculty Publications

Title

Race/Ethnicity and Traumatic Brain Injury: Are There Disparities in Positive Screenings and Diagnoses Among Service Members Returning From Afghanistan and Iraq?

Document Type

Article

Keywords

health disparities, military, race and ethnicity, traumatic brain injury

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Armed Forces and Society

Volume

45

Issue

1

First Page

155

Last Page

176

Abstract

The authors examine racial/ethnic differences in screening positive for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in diagnosis among service members upon returning from war in Afghanistan and Iraq. Using data from the Post-Deployment Health Assessment and Re-Assessment, and military health-care encounters from 2008 to 2009, they estimate logistic regressions in a sample of 46,488 service members. Hispanic and Asian service members do not differ from White service members in screening positive for TBI but have 19% and 33% lower odds of diagnosis, respectively. Compared to White service members, Black service members are less likely to screen positive for TBI immediately after deployment and about as likely 3–6 months later, yet have 27% lower odds of diagnosis. Further, racial/ethnic minority service members have a lower probability of TBI diagnosis than White service members at all self-reported symptom levels, suggesting there is a discrepancy between symptoms and diagnosis related to race/ethnicity.

Department

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

Original Publication Date

1-1-2019

DOI of published version

10.1177/0095327X18761852

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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