Faculty Publications

Title

Sex-role attitudes and perceptual learning

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Social Psychology

Volume

125

Issue

2

First Page

233

Last Page

243

Abstract

Two studies evaluated the relationship between attitudes toward sex roles and learning of nonsense syllables associated with pictured situations differing in sex-role appropriateness. Syllables associated with inappropriate situations were learned faster than those associated with appropriate situations; among women non-traditionals had faster learning rates than traditionals. When the Ellis-Bentler scale was used as the attitude measure, both traditional men and nontraditional women did not differ in learning rates as a function of the appropriateness of pictured situations associated with nonsense syllables, whereas for both nontraditional men and traditional women syllables associated with inappropriate situations were learned faster than those associated with neutral or appropriate situations. When the Spence-Helmreich Attitude Toward Women Scale was used as the attitude measure in the second study, sex-role attitude had no impact on learning rate, but when Doyle and Moore's Attitude Toward the Male's Role Scale was used in a subset of these men, there was an Attitude × Appropriateness interaction similar to that obtained in Study 1 for men. © 1985 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original Publication Date

1-1-1985

DOI of published version

10.1080/00224545.1985.9922876

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