Faculty Publications

Title

Colonel Francis Parker and beginning reading instruction

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Reading Research and Instruction

Volume

26

Issue

3

First Page

141

Last Page

150

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, Colonel Francis Parker sought to humanize public education, including the teaching of beginning reading. Parker advocated a form of reading instruction that capitalized on children's interests and searches for meaning; this was consistent with his attempts to integrate school with children's lives. In order to increase reading achievement, Parker sought to connect reading with children's interests and backgrounds, with study of the content areas, and with modes of expression such as speaking, drawing, oral reading, and writing. He recommended word recognition instruction that connected whole words with thoughts and that associated words of common spelling patterns. Contemporary educators who know Parker's work have a perspective for judging current movements in education. Parker's view of instruction offers guidelines for present day lesson planning. Modern educators also might compare their viewpoints about appropriate beginning reading instruction with Parker's for purposes of clarification. © 1987 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original Publication Date

1-1-1987

DOI of published version

10.1080/19388078709557906

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