Faculty Publications

Title

Cognitive profiles of japanese and canadian kindergarten and first-grade children

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Social Psychology

Volume

132

Issue

4

First Page

505

Last Page

512

Abstract

Japanese kindergarten and first-grade children were given the Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test (CCAT), with slight cultural modifications. Widely used in Canadian and American schools, the CCAT consists of three batteries: verbal, quantitative, and nonverbal. The sample consisted of 454 Japanese children (234 boys, 220 girls). Results were examined by 3-month age intervals (chronological age range, 60 to 87 months of age). Subjects' scores were compared with CCAT norms, based on the performance of 3,500 Canadian children at each age level. On each battery, the Japanese children outperformed their Canadian counterparts, but the differential was most apparent on the verbal battery. Moreover, on the nonverbal battery for kindergarten Japanese children (ages 60 to 72 months), significant differences appeared only with the 60- to 63-month age cohort. Results indicate that the higher achievement of Japanese children was apparent by the time they entered kindergarten and that higher Japanese educational productivity could not be solely attributed to schooling effects. Furthermore, the data indicate that the early academic advantage of Japanese children may widen as they progress through their first year of school. (Longitudinal replication studies are suggested for examination of the long-range impact of the early cognitive advantage of Japanese children.) © 1992 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original Publication Date

1-1-1992

DOI of published version

10.1080/00224545.1992.9924730

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