Faculty Publications

Title

What factors influence student satisfaction with module quality? A comparative analysis in a UK business school context

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Business school, MEQ, Module evaluation, Regression analysis, Student satisfaction

Journal/Book/Conference Title

International Journal of Management Education

Volume

17

Issue

3

Abstract

Understanding the links between student satisfaction and module teaching quality is a concern to UK business schools. This paper explores the determinants of overall student module satisfaction, as well as their relative importance, comparing the module evaluation questionnaire (MEQ) responses of undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG) students in a UK business school. Based upon econometric modelling of the MEQ averages from 470 UG modules (21,096 student responses) and 93 masters modules (4429 responses) our results identify several key factors driving overall satisfaction in both groups. The helpfulness of lectures and seminars, involving direct student-teacher contact time, is the most important determinant of satisfaction. This is followed, in order of importance, by: the degree to which a module integrates well with other elements of the course; the usefulness of supporting on-line materials; and the appropriateness of summative assignments. Readings and feedback on formative assignments appear weaker drivers of overall satisfaction, particularly for PG students, as is the negative impact of perceived module difficulty. Module difficulty, however, is a strong driver of dissatisfaction for both groups, raising the question of whether excessive use of MEQs may lead to ‘dumbing down’ processes in higher education.

Department

Department of Management

Original Publication Date

11-1-2019

DOI of published version

10.1016/j.ijme.2019.100312

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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