Faculty Publications

Title

Frequent, ungraded testing as an instructional strategy

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Experimental Education

Volume

62

Issue

2

First Page

93

Last Page

101

Abstract

In the present study we investigated the effects of frequent, ungraded tests on graded unit tests, instructional strategy preferences, and student ratings of course and instructor effectiveness. Two developmental psychology classes were taught using instructional strategies identified as effective in the literature. In addition, the experimental (formative) class completed frequent, ungraded tests. Results indicated that the mean performance of students in the two classes did not differ on any of the unit tests. Significantly more students in the formative class indicated they would prefer to take frequent, ungraded tests in other courses. Formative and control students assigned equally high ratings of effectiveness to the course and the course instructor. Implications for future research are discussed. © 1994 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original Publication Date

1-1-1994

DOI of published version

10.1080/00220973.1994.9943833

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