Faculty Publications

Title

Depression and intimate partner violence among urban Kenyan caregivers of children with disabilities

Document Type

Article

Keywords

caregivers of children with disability, depression, intimate partner violence, Kenya

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

Volume

27

Issue

1

First Page

41

Last Page

53

Abstract

What is known on the subject?: Caregivers of children with disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing interpersonal violence and its consequences; however, there is limited research targeting this population. This problem is understudied in Sub-Saharan Africa. What this paper adds to existing knowledge?: Study examines intimate partner violence and depression among men and women caregivers of children with disabilities. Study findings showed that while a higher proportion of women caregivers of children with disabilities than men reported experiencing intimate partner violence and were at increased risk depression, the differences were not statistically significant. Participants reporting any form of violence (i.e. psychological aggression or physical assault) were at increased risk for depression, with those experiencing a combination of physical assault and psychological aggression having the highest risk for depression. What are the implications for practice?: Professionals working families of individuals with disabilities should be cognizant of the added stress and comorbid factors associated with caring for a child with a disability. Future research should examine whether there is a causal relationship between intimate partner violence and depression among caregivers of children with disabilities and compare this relationship with the general population. Abstract: Introduction Mental health correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization are well documented. However, caregivers of children with disabilities (CCWDs) are underrepresented in empirical investigations and may have an increased risk of experiencing IPV and its consequences. This is particularly important in Sub-Saharan Africa where this problem is understudied. Method The present study estimated the prevalence of IPV victimization and examined the association between IPV and depression in a sample of CCWDs living in Nairobi, Kenya. Results Nearly half (49.8%) of the participants experienced some form of IPV and more than half (51.8%) were at risk of depression. Participants reporting psychological and physical violence were 1.76 and 4.81 times more likely to be at risk for depression, respectively. Those experiencing a combination of physical and psychological violence were 4.85 times more likely to be at risk for depression. Discussion Both men and women CCWDs are at an increased risk for IPV and depression. Social–cultural factors are also important in the prediction of depression risk and should be taken into account when working with CCWDs. Implications Mental health professionals should be cognizant of the added stress of being a CCWD, and the link between CCWDs and comorbid mental health outcomes.

Original Publication Date

2-1-2020

DOI of published version

10.1111/jpm.12550

Repository

UNI ScholarWorks, Rod Library, University of Northern Iowa

Language

en

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