Faculty Publications

Title

Law, social science, federal and state agencies, resurgence of Tabula Rasa, and perpetuation of racial problems

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Academic freedom, Brown v. Board of Education, Educational reform, Law and the social sciences, Political correctness, School desegregation

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Mankind Quarterly

Volume

46

Issue

1

First Page

81

Last Page

98

Abstract

In Brown v. Board of Education, largely relying on social science evidence, the U.S. Supreme Court concluded that the Black-White academic achievement gap was largely if not entirely attributable to racial segregation of schools. Guided by Brown, lower courts initially outlawed de jure school segregation which had denied African-American children the right to attend neighborhood schools. Subsequently, and again based on Brown, rulings were broadened to implement de facto desegregation which ignored neighborhood considerations and required "racially balanced schools." More than five decades after Brown, which eventuall y disrupted millions of lives and expended billions of dollars, the racial achievement gap remains unchanged and African-Americans do not experience a higher quality of life. This paper examines evidence that the Supreme Court was knowingly misled concerning desegregatory effects, and that major institutions such as academia, the courts, the media, and governmental agencies not only fail to acknowledge, but instead perpetuate, historic errors.

Original Publication Date

1-1-2005

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS