Faculty Publications

Title

Extending the demands-control model: A daily diary study of job characteristics, work-family conflict and work-family facilitation

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology

Volume

78

Issue

2

First Page

155

Last Page

169

Abstract

Using personal digital assistants, 91 parents employed in non-professional occupations were surveyed for 14 consecutive days about their job characteristics and work-family experiences. We found significant daily variation in work-to-family conflict (WFC) and work-to-family facilitation (WFF) that was predictable from daily job characteristics. Higher levels of WFC were associated with greater job demands and control at work. Contrary to the demands-control model (Karasek, 1979), these two job characteristics interacted such that the relationship between demands and WFC was stronger when control was high. We also found that demands were negatively related and control and skill level positively related to WFF. The results suggest ways in which jobs may be redesigned to enhance individuals' work-family experiences. © 2005 The British Psychological Society.

Original Publication Date

6-1-2005

DOI of published version

10.1348/096317905X40097

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