Faculty Publications

Title

Attitudes toward immigrant groups and the September 11 terrorist attacks

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Peace and Conflict

Volume

13

Issue

2

First Page

135

Last Page

152

Abstract

The current research examined prejudice and perceived threat toward Mexican and Arab immigrants/immigration along the U.S./Mexico border. Sample 1 (n = 84) was collected before September 11; attitudes toward Mexican immigrants were assessed. Sample 2 (n = 140) was collected one month after September 11 and Sample 3 (n = 180) was collected one year later; attitudes toward both Mexican and Arab immigrants were assessed. U.S. citizens completed a social attitudes survey assessing symbolic threat, perceived realistic threat, and prejudice. Individual differences, such as American identity and political orientation, were also measured. As predicted, in samples 2 and 3 Arab immigrant's engendered greater levels of symbolic threat and prejudice among participants compared to Mexican immigrants and immigration. Participants also reported greater perceived realistic threat from Mexican immigrants after September 11 than before. American identity was positively related to threat and prejudice with respect to both immigrant groups. The response patterns represent a nuanced response associated with the attacks. Findings are discussed in terms of the social implications for immigrants and immigration to the U.S. Copyright © 2007, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Original Publication Date

1-1-2007

DOI of published version

10.1080/10781910701270970

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