Faculty Publications

Title

Associations among eating regulation and body mass index, weight, and body fat in college students: The moderating role of gender

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Body fat, Body mass index, Body weight, College students, Eating regulation

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Eating Behaviors

Volume

15

Issue

2

First Page

321

Last Page

327

Abstract

This study investigated associations between eating regulation behaviors and body mass index (BMI), weight, and percent body fat in male and female students over the first two years of college. Subjects included 328 college students (215 females and 113 males). Height and weight (via standard techniques), body composition (via bioelectrical impedance analysis), and eating regulation behaviors (using the Regulation of Eating Behavior Scale) were conducted two to three times during both the freshman and sophomore years. Significant associations between eating regulation and BMI, weight, and/or percent body fat were shown mostly in females. In females, higher BMI, weight, and/or percent body fat at the end of the second year of college were found in those with low levels of autonomous, intrinsic motivation, and identified regulation, and high levels of amotivation, while lower BMI, weight, and/or percent body fat were associated with high levels of autonomous, intrinsic motivation, and identified regulation, and low levels of amotivation. The findings that specific eating behaviors in females during the first two years of college influence BMI, weight, and/or percent body fat may be useful for inclusion in university programs focused on college student health to help decrease the risk of obesity and disordered eating/eating disorders in female college students. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Original Publication Date

1-1-2014

DOI of published version

10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.04.002

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