Faculty Publications

Title

Neighborhood networks, social capital, and political participation: The relationships revisited

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Journal of Urban Affairs

Volume

37

Issue

2

First Page

122

Last Page

143

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between informal networks of interaction and trust among neighbors and political engagement by neighborhood residents. The United States lacks mass-based political organizations that directly represent the interests of poor and working class citizens. Therefore, geographically based neighborhood associations are one of the few mechanisms available to represent these interests. The segregation of urban neighborhoods by class and race presents many disadvantages for lower income residents, but geographical concentration can have the advantage of facilitating organized political action. Because neighborhood organizations are such an important mechanism by which disadvantaged urban populations assert their needs and perspectives, it is critical to understand which characteristics of residents encourage the formation of such organizations and enable them to be effective in influencing public policies. What kinds of networks and relationships exist among residents of lower income neighborhoods that might encourage them to organize for political action?

Original Publication Date

5-1-2015

DOI of published version

10.1111/juaf.12137

Share

COinS