Faculty Publications

Title

Homework, motivation, and academic achievement in a college genetics course

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Academic achievement, College student performance, Genetics education, Homework, Motivation

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Bioscene

Volume

41

Issue

2

First Page

11

Last Page

18

Abstract

We conducted a mixed methods study in an upper-level genetics course exploring the relationships between student motivation, homework completion, and academic achievement at the college level. We used data from an open-ended questionnaire, homework grades and completion reports, and exam scores. We used these data sources to measure self-perceived motivating/demotivating factors and then tested these factors for correlation with homework completion and academic achievement. We found no significance in homework completion when considering credit or extra credit as a motivating factor. According to student reports they completed significantly more homework when considering reinforcement of content as a motivating factor. However, we found discrepancies between students’ reported motivation and actual completion rates. Self-reported study style, selfperceived conscientiousness, intelligence, attitude, time commitments, and complexity of assignments had significant impacts on whether or not students completed homework assignments and impacted students’ academic achievement. Overall, we found a positive relationship between homework completion and academic achievement within this upper-level college genetics course and provide implications for increasing student motivation.

Original Publication Date

12-1-2015

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