Theses and Dissertations @ UNI

Availability

Open Access Dissertation

Abstract

This study investigated the use of selected at risk factors to predict student high school success. In addition, academic and social viewpoints of students in grades 9-11 who had been retained were investigated, as were the perceptions of their parents. The sample was drawn from two public school districts which were representative of rural schools in a Midwestern state. A total of 373 students in grades 9-11 from both districts participated. Data on 26 selected at risk factors were gathered from school records and personnel to determine predictors of school success. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, step-wise multiple regression, and correlational analysis.

Fifteen students who had been retained in grades K-4 participated in an interview dealing with views of school, while parents completed a mailed survey concerning their perceptions of how the students viewed school. Tabulations and frequency analyses were used to ascertain patterns of responses and whether parents and children shared similar viewpoints about school and retention.

Findings indicated that combinations of at risk factors served as significant predictors of students' success in high school. Self-concept score was predicted using a combination of grade point average, lack of participation in extracurricular activities, IQ score, and number of failed courses. Performance on Test Q (Quantitative) of the ITED was predicted using a combination of the Reading Total of the ITED, grade point average, IQ score, and number of failed courses. Performance on the Reading Total of the ITED was predicted using a combination of Test Q score, grade point average, lack of participation in extracurricular activities, IQ score, and being the youngest or only child in the family. Grade point average was predicted using a combination of Heading Total, number of failed courses, Test Q score, IQ score,attendance, number of sibling dropouts, and self-concept score.

Findings also indicated that high school students who were retained and their parents showed positive agreement about academic, general, and social perceptions. Students viewed the effects of retention on current academic and social status more positively than did the parents.

Year of Submission

1992

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Date Original

1992

Object Description

1 PDF file (VI, 130 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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