Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Availability

Open Access Dissertation

Keywords

Minority college students--Middle West; College dropouts--Middle West--Prevention; Mentoring in education;

Abstract

Because low-income, first-generation, and disabled individuals have limited access to postsecondary education, Congress established TRIO, a series of programs designed to provide access to college for this targeted population. One initiative suggested to aid in retention and graduation for these TRIO students was mentoring. This study examined the perceived benefits of faculty mentoring for first-generation TRIO students to facilitate retention and graduation rates at a Midwestern Community College. Three faculty members and three TRIO students were interviewed to determine their perception of the benefits of faculty mentoring. The results were consistent with the literature that students who have access to TRIO programs and a mentoring relationship are more likely to succeed in college compared to students without this assistance.

Year of Submission

2007

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Postsecondary Education

First Advisor

Susan Etscheidt, Chair

Second Advisor

J. Ana Donaldson, Co-Chair

Date Original

12-2007

Object Description

1 PDF file (ix, 181 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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