Electronic Theses and Dissertations

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Open Access Dissertation

Keywords

University of Northern Iowa--Students--Psychology; College athletes--Iowa--Cedar Falls--Psychology; Male college students--Iowa--Cedar Falls-- Psychology; African American male college students--Iowa--Cedar Falls--Psychology;

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate non-cognitive motivational factors as indicators of academic achievement of male athletes and male non-athletes as measured by a secondary data analysis of the College Student Inventory (CSI) from Fall 2003 to Fall 2005. Deci and Ryan's (2000) self-determination theory provided the conceptual framework for this study.

The CSI was administered through a survey technique. Participants in the survey sample were selected from 142 first semester freshman male athletes and male non-athletes enrolled at a Midwestern University.

The data gathered from the CSI provided information on non-cognitive variables of academic and social motivation as indicators of academic achievement. This study compared the CSI motivational factor scores to the first semester and second semester grade point averages (GPA) of male athletes and male non-athletes. Four statistical tests were generated: (1) descriptive statistics, (2) t -tests, (3) correlation analysis (Pearson r ), and (4) analysis of variance (ANOVA). Descriptive statistical analysis was used to determine the sample characteristics, frequencies, and percentages of male athletes and male non-athletes. The t -test was used to gather GPA basic data means for male athletes, male non-athletes, race, and sport. The independent t -test was used to test for a difference between the means of male athletes and male non-athletes. Comparisons for significance of first and second semester GPA, CSI motivational scores (academic motivation and social motivation), race, and sport were conducted using correlation analysis. The difference in motivational factor scores between UNI male student-athletes and male non-athletes by race and sport was determined by the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

The data analysis indicated that (1) The College Student Inventory (CSI) academic motivation and social motivation scales were not indicators of academic achievement/GPA, (2) There is a difference in motivation factor scores and GPA's between male athletes and non-athletes, (3) The null hypothesis that motivation factor scores (academic motivation and social motivation) cannot indicate academic achievement/(GPA) is retained, (4) The null hypothesis that there is no difference in motivational factor scores between male student-athletes and male non-athletes at UNI by race and sport is rejected, (5) Male non-athletes are more likely to enjoy classroom discussions and feel comfortable with the high level of intellectual activity that often occurs in the college classroom than male athletes, (6) Caucasian males and Hispanic males have a more positive attitude towards educators than African American males and this may affect their academic achievement, (7) African American males have a greater capacity to make their own decisions and carry through with them than Caucasian males, (8) Male non-athletes are more likely to enjoy classroom discussions and feel comfortable with the high level of intellectual activity that often occurs in the college classroom than male football athletes, (9) Male non-athletes have a greater capacity to make their own decisions and carry through with them than male baseball athletes.

The results of this study indicate the need for academic and social support programs for male athletes and male non-athletes to ensure positive progression towards academic achievement.

Year of Submission

2010

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services

First Advisor

Scharron Clayton, Co-Chair

Second Advisor

Samuel Lankford, Co-Chair

Date Original

5-2010

Object Description

1 PDF file (x, 135 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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