Complete Schedule

Presentation Type

Open Access Breakout Session

Keywords

Asian Americans--History--Study and teaching; Asian American teachers--Attitudes;

Abstract

This paper examines how three Asian American elementary teachers' pedagogical decisions regarding the teaching of Asian American history were influenced by their understandings of citizenship and reveals how broader understandings of citizenship can result in more inclusive cultural citizenship education. The theoretical frame of Asian Critical Race Theory (AsianCrit) was essential to this examination as it centered the Asian American experience in the teachers' decision-making processes, asserting the significance of their common identity as Asian Americans in spite of their personal and professional differences. Through their work, the teachers (re)defined what it meant to be Asian American, to be American (citizen), and ultimately enacted cultural citizenship education, which disrupted traditional and normative examples of civic agents and civic action, as they presented their students with Asian American counternarratives. The paper concludes with practical applications of cultural citizenship education for inservice and preservice social studies educators and teacher educators.

Start Date

7-11-2017 10:20 AM

End Date

7-11-2017 11:20 AM

Comments

Speaker: Dr. Noreen Naseem Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, Iowa State University

Type: Paper

Strand: Diversity & Cultural Competence

Location: Presidential Room, Maucker Union, University of Northern Iowa

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Period

10-1-2017

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Nov 7th, 10:20 AM Nov 7th, 11:20 AM

2D1. “You Can Be a Bridge”: Toward Cultural Citizenship in Elementary Classrooms

This paper examines how three Asian American elementary teachers' pedagogical decisions regarding the teaching of Asian American history were influenced by their understandings of citizenship and reveals how broader understandings of citizenship can result in more inclusive cultural citizenship education. The theoretical frame of Asian Critical Race Theory (AsianCrit) was essential to this examination as it centered the Asian American experience in the teachers' decision-making processes, asserting the significance of their common identity as Asian Americans in spite of their personal and professional differences. Through their work, the teachers (re)defined what it meant to be Asian American, to be American (citizen), and ultimately enacted cultural citizenship education, which disrupted traditional and normative examples of civic agents and civic action, as they presented their students with Asian American counternarratives. The paper concludes with practical applications of cultural citizenship education for inservice and preservice social studies educators and teacher educators.