Complete Schedule

Presentation Type

Open Access Breakout Session

Keywords

English language--Study and teaching--Foreign speakers; Foreign students--Services for--United States;

Abstract

Multicultural K-12 education in the U.S. is facing more cultural competence challenges. Even though, in the last decade, there is an increase of bicultural programs in public schools, a population of students coming from immigrated families are invisible to such programs: English Language Learners from locally Underrepresented Languages (ELL-UL). These students cannot be part of bilingual programs because there are not funds allocated for hiring bilingual teachers to cover a small number of students. Research shows that ELL students have either a high dropout rate or unsuccessful academic performance: ELL-ULs are the underserved part of this population of students. This paper first describes the special situation the ELL-UL students in the U.S. public education: low self-esteem, stressed cultural pride, unhealthy affective commitment, etc. Secondly, I propose solutions to create a healthy transition to American language and culture that can improve their academic achievement.

Start Date

7-11-2017 1:10 PM

End Date

7-11-2017 2:10 PM

Comments

Speaker: Milan M’Enesti, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oregon

Type: Paper

Strand: Social-Emotional Learning

Location: Elm Room, Maucker Union, University of Northern Iowa

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Period

10-1-2017

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Nov 7th, 1:10 PM Nov 7th, 2:10 PM

3S2. Filling the Gap for English Language Learning from Underrepresented Language Students (ELL-UL)

Multicultural K-12 education in the U.S. is facing more cultural competence challenges. Even though, in the last decade, there is an increase of bicultural programs in public schools, a population of students coming from immigrated families are invisible to such programs: English Language Learners from locally Underrepresented Languages (ELL-UL). These students cannot be part of bilingual programs because there are not funds allocated for hiring bilingual teachers to cover a small number of students. Research shows that ELL students have either a high dropout rate or unsuccessful academic performance: ELL-ULs are the underserved part of this population of students. This paper first describes the special situation the ELL-UL students in the U.S. public education: low self-esteem, stressed cultural pride, unhealthy affective commitment, etc. Secondly, I propose solutions to create a healthy transition to American language and culture that can improve their academic achievement.