Complete Schedule

Presentation Type

Open Access Breakout Session

Keywords

African American school superintendents; Women superintendents;

Abstract

African American women are underrepresented in the superintendency (Angel, Killacky, & Johnson, 2013; Bynum & Young, 2015; Grogan, 2014; Kowalski, McCord, Petersen, Young, & Ellerson, 2011; Liang, Sottile, & Peters, 2016; Robicheau & Krull, 2016). In their journeys, they face barriers such as discrimination based on race and gender, negative stereotypes, and a lack of opportunity (Angel et al., 2013; Grogan, 2014; Kowalski et al., 2011; Liang et al., 2016). This phenomenological study (Glesne, 1999; Moustakas, 1994; van Manen, 1990) examines the barriers experienced by four African American women superintendents in a Southern state as well as the resiliency (Henderson & Milstein, 2003) strategies they employed to overcome the challenges they encountered en route to and within the superintendency. The purpose of this discourse is to highlight the role community support plays in the success of these superintendents to fill a gap in extant research.

Start Date

7-11-2017 1:10 PM

End Date

7-11-2017 2:10 PM

Comments

Speaker: Dr. Francemise Kingsberry, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Type: Paper

Strand: Community Engagement & Partnerships

Location: Oak Room, Maucker Union, University of Northern Iowa

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Period

10-1-2017

Share

COinS
 
Nov 7th, 1:10 PM Nov 7th, 2:10 PM

3C1. The Role of Community Support in Navigating the Superintendency for African American Women

African American women are underrepresented in the superintendency (Angel, Killacky, & Johnson, 2013; Bynum & Young, 2015; Grogan, 2014; Kowalski, McCord, Petersen, Young, & Ellerson, 2011; Liang, Sottile, & Peters, 2016; Robicheau & Krull, 2016). In their journeys, they face barriers such as discrimination based on race and gender, negative stereotypes, and a lack of opportunity (Angel et al., 2013; Grogan, 2014; Kowalski et al., 2011; Liang et al., 2016). This phenomenological study (Glesne, 1999; Moustakas, 1994; van Manen, 1990) examines the barriers experienced by four African American women superintendents in a Southern state as well as the resiliency (Henderson & Milstein, 2003) strategies they employed to overcome the challenges they encountered en route to and within the superintendency. The purpose of this discourse is to highlight the role community support plays in the success of these superintendents to fill a gap in extant research.