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Title

A Study of the Institutionalized Discrimination Against Afghan Women at the Workplace

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to inquire about the Afghan female workers’ workplace experiences of employment discrimination. To do so, I used the post-structuralist, post-modernist, and critical feminist theoretical framework and studied Afghan female workers’ experiences of workplace discrimination from the structuralist, performance of identity, and masculinities approaches to the study of discrimination. Furthermore, I adopted an intersectional lens to assess workplace discrimination against Afghan women more comprehensively. Also, I studied their experiences at the interpersonal, inter-group, and intra-group levels. Using an interpretive methodological paradigm, nine Afghan women, who worked across sectors and belonged to diverse backgrounds, were interviewed. To fully understand participants’ experiences and the meaning they associated with those experiences, in-depth interviews were conducted and semi-structured questions were asked.
Findings of this study show that work is gendered and gendering for Afghan women because they face sexism in the intersection of ethnocentrism and ageism, and they are discriminated against based on their sex at the intersection of their religiosity and the lack of it.

Start Date

13-4-2021 11:00 AM

End Date

13-4-2021 12:00 PM

Faculty Advisor

Tom Hall

Department

Women's and Gender Studies Program

Student Type

Graduate Student

Comments

This entry was part of the following session of the event:

  • Session title: Social Issues & Political Perspectives; Tuesday, April 13, 2021; 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.; Moderator: Matthew Bunker.

Electronic copy is not available through UNI ScholarWorks.

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Apr 13th, 11:00 AM Apr 13th, 12:00 PM

A Study of the Institutionalized Discrimination Against Afghan Women at the Workplace

The purpose of this study was to inquire about the Afghan female workers’ workplace experiences of employment discrimination. To do so, I used the post-structuralist, post-modernist, and critical feminist theoretical framework and studied Afghan female workers’ experiences of workplace discrimination from the structuralist, performance of identity, and masculinities approaches to the study of discrimination. Furthermore, I adopted an intersectional lens to assess workplace discrimination against Afghan women more comprehensively. Also, I studied their experiences at the interpersonal, inter-group, and intra-group levels. Using an interpretive methodological paradigm, nine Afghan women, who worked across sectors and belonged to diverse backgrounds, were interviewed. To fully understand participants’ experiences and the meaning they associated with those experiences, in-depth interviews were conducted and semi-structured questions were asked.
Findings of this study show that work is gendered and gendering for Afghan women because they face sexism in the intersection of ethnocentrism and ageism, and they are discriminated against based on their sex at the intersection of their religiosity and the lack of it.