2016 Research in the Capitol

Title

Perceptions of Use of Hearing Protection in High String Musicians

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Keywords

Musicians--Wounds and injuries--Prevention; Deafness, Noise induced--Prevention;

Abstract

Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is a common occupational disease, especially in musicians. Research shows high string players have poorer thresholds in their left ear compared to other orchestral players. My research focused on two questions: (1) How does wearing hearing protection impact a performer’s experience? and (2) can high string players adjust to use of hearing protection? Participants took an initial survey and received a hearing test. Then, participants wore hearing protection over three weeks during solo practice and large ensemble rehearsals, completing surveys at the end of each week. These surveys included qualitative self-assessment of key components of musicality: tone, intonation, practicing and musical experience. My goal is to encourage musicians to wear ear protection, so they function in their profession longer. This also identifies areas for further research- when use of hearing protection should begin, and how students can be encouraged to wear hearing protection.

Start Date

29-3-2016 11:30 AM

End Date

29-3-2016 1:30 PM

Event Host

University Honors Program, Iowa Regent Universities

Faculty Advisor

Julia Bullard

Faculty Advisor

Jami Gilbert

Department

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Department

School of Music

Comments

Location: Iowa State House, Rotunda, Des Moines, Iowa

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Mar 29th, 11:30 AM Mar 29th, 1:30 PM

Perceptions of Use of Hearing Protection in High String Musicians

Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) is a common occupational disease, especially in musicians. Research shows high string players have poorer thresholds in their left ear compared to other orchestral players. My research focused on two questions: (1) How does wearing hearing protection impact a performer’s experience? and (2) can high string players adjust to use of hearing protection? Participants took an initial survey and received a hearing test. Then, participants wore hearing protection over three weeks during solo practice and large ensemble rehearsals, completing surveys at the end of each week. These surveys included qualitative self-assessment of key components of musicality: tone, intonation, practicing and musical experience. My goal is to encourage musicians to wear ear protection, so they function in their profession longer. This also identifies areas for further research- when use of hearing protection should begin, and how students can be encouraged to wear hearing protection.