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Document Type

Research

Keywords

biocontrol, Pteridium aquilinum, Septoria aquilina

Abstract

Septoria aquilina, a pathogenic fungus isolated from Pteridium aquilinum growing in the Black Hills was studied from 1991-1995. S. aquilina sprayed at 8,000 conidia/ml on transplanted fronds followed by high humidity caused severe necrosis seven days after inoculation and disease severity increased until fronds died. Severe necrosis also developed from inoculations at 4,000 and 2,000 conidia/ml. Less severe symptoms developed from inoculations at 1,000 conidia/ml. Inoculations at 4,000 conidia/ml not followed by high humidity caused less necrosis than inoculations at the same concentration with high humidity. Inoculations at 4,000, 2,000, and 1,000 conidia/ml on fronds grown from spores caused similar levels of necrosis as inoculations on transplanted fronds. Necrotic epidermal and mesophyll cells were observed in pinnules. In rachises, portions of cortex, endodermis, xylem, and phloem showed abnormal cells or cell destruction. Hyphae were observed infrequently and only in the epidermis and mesophyll of pinnules. S. aquiline is a candidate for field evaluation as a biocontrol agent.

Publication Date

July-December 1996

Journal Title

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science

Volume

103

Issue

3-4

First Page

74

Last Page

79

Copyright

© Copyright 1996 by the Iowa Academy of Science, Inc.

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf