•  
  •  
 

Authors

Shannon Tucker

Document Type

Research

Abstract

MRSA infection is a major concern in animals and, as in humans, animals can also become carriers. It is suspected that most animals acquire MRSA from humans (reverse zoonosis) (Heot & Hough, 2008). In 1959, Mann was one of the first to culture the nostrils of cats and dogs for Staphylococcus sp. and he "proposed that the common house pet can serve as an important reservoir or carrier of staphylococci infective for man" (Mann, 1959). In the 1970's MRSA strains were isolated in milk samples in Belgium (Devriese, Van Damme, & Fameree, 1972) (Devriese & Hommez, 1975). Humans can be carriers for weeks to years with no symptoms. Colonized animals can also harbor the bacteria, yet show no clinical signs of infection. Animals that are carriers of MRSA can be detected by culture and sensitivity testing on nasal, ear and rectal swabs. Dogs and cats have not demonstrated any long term colonization as of yet, however, pigs and horses can become long term carriers (Heot & Hough, 2008). At this time the toxin that causes "flesh eating" staphylococci infections in humans has not been seen in animals, but information about MRSA is changing rapidly (Hillier & Shulaw, 2008).

Publication Date

2009

Journal Title

International Journal of Global Health and Health Disparities

Volume

6

Issue

1

First Page

80

Last Page

89

Copyright

© Copyright 2009 by the International Journal of Global Health and Health Disparities

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Public Health Commons

Share

COinS
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.