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Presentation Type

Open Access Poster Presentation

Keywords

Medical ethics--Study and teaching; Occupational therapists--Professional ethics; Occupational therapists--Training of;

Abstract

Health care education programs are struggling in preparing future graduates for ethical practice. Students need to not only develop a better understand ethics, but also value them and learn to self-evaluate their progress in becoming ethical practitioners. To this end, educators need to imbed ethics into all classes and allow for consistent skill practice. Incorporating “habitual” practice can support later consistent skill performance. According to the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) developed by researcher and occupational therapist, Dr. Gary Kielhofner, “habituation is an internalized readiness to exhibit consistent patterns of behavior guided by our habits and roles and fitted to the characteristics of routine temporal, physical, and social environments” (Kielhofner, 2002, p. 63). Habitual ethical performance can support consistent performance in practice.

Health care students also need to learn to regularly self-evaluate their ethical performance. Without the constant influence of their educators, graduates have the potential to embrace “short-cuts”, putting their ethical practice at risk. By learning new skills for regular self-evaluation and habitually practicing them, the students can continue to assure that they remain ethical in their health care interactions.

This poster utilizes occupational therapy philosophy and a highly respected model of occupational therapy practice to present a process for developing professional and ethical practitioners that are successful self-evaluators of their ethical, professional practice. As the presenters of this poster, the OT Faculty of Allen College will additionally discuss their plan for incorporating this process into the new Master of Science degree program in occupational therapy beginning this fall.

Reference: Kielhofner, G. (2002). A Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins.

Start Date

18-9-2015 9:45 AM

End Date

18-9-2015 10:15 AM

Event Host

Center for Academic Ethics, University of Northern Iowa

Comments

Location: Mauker Union - Ballroom Lobby

File Format

application/pdf

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Sep 18th, 9:45 AM Sep 18th, 10:15 AM

Applying the Model of Human Occupation in the Development of Consistent Ethical Behavior

Health care education programs are struggling in preparing future graduates for ethical practice. Students need to not only develop a better understand ethics, but also value them and learn to self-evaluate their progress in becoming ethical practitioners. To this end, educators need to imbed ethics into all classes and allow for consistent skill practice. Incorporating “habitual” practice can support later consistent skill performance. According to the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) developed by researcher and occupational therapist, Dr. Gary Kielhofner, “habituation is an internalized readiness to exhibit consistent patterns of behavior guided by our habits and roles and fitted to the characteristics of routine temporal, physical, and social environments” (Kielhofner, 2002, p. 63). Habitual ethical performance can support consistent performance in practice.

Health care students also need to learn to regularly self-evaluate their ethical performance. Without the constant influence of their educators, graduates have the potential to embrace “short-cuts”, putting their ethical practice at risk. By learning new skills for regular self-evaluation and habitually practicing them, the students can continue to assure that they remain ethical in their health care interactions.

This poster utilizes occupational therapy philosophy and a highly respected model of occupational therapy practice to present a process for developing professional and ethical practitioners that are successful self-evaluators of their ethical, professional practice. As the presenters of this poster, the OT Faculty of Allen College will additionally discuss their plan for incorporating this process into the new Master of Science degree program in occupational therapy beginning this fall.

Reference: Kielhofner, G. (2002). A Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins.