Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Award/Availability

Open Access Dissertation

Keywords

Mainstreaming in education--Iowa; Children with disabilities--Iowa--Education;

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate Iowa elementary classroom teachers perceptions regarding the conditions required for successfully including students identified as severely disabled in their regular classroom. Specifically, data were gathered to determine the types and ranking of types of support perceived necessary for such inclusion. Additionally, how actual levels of support differed from those deemed necessary and teacher willingness to accept these students were investigated. Comparisons were made between teachers with experience and those without experience in teaching students identified as severely disabled in the regular classroom.

An adapted version of the survey instrument devised by Myles and Simpson (1989) was used to collect the information directly from regular classroom teachers. Each quadrant of the state was surveyed using a total of 25 schools. Schools were selected from those identified by area consultants as schools currently having programs in which students identified as severely disabled were being taught in the regular classroom. A total of 202 teachers were surveyed. Data were analyzed using a chi-square test for independence to determine if the differences were statistically significant.

Analysis of the data gathered indicated that the majority of teachers from both groups were willing to accept the placement of students identified as severely disabled in their classroom if that placement was accompanied by a minimal level of support. The level of support which teachers perceived as minimally necessary included the following: a class size of 19 or less, paraprofessional services for the full school day, at least 2 hours of planning time, consultation with a special educator regarding instruction and behavior management, and inservice in instruction and behavior management. Class size, paraprofessional, and planning time ranked (in that order) as the most necessary types of support for successful inclusion.

Date of Award

1992

Degree Name

Doctor of Education

Department

Department of Special Education

First Advisor

Susan Stainback

Date Original

5-1992

Object Description

1 PDF file (v, 77 pages)

Language

EN

File Format

application/pdf

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