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Title

Attitudes and Knowledge Concerning Concussions and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Concussion and traumatic brain injury awareness has grown exponentially over the last few years through the testimonies of professional athletes, medical professionals, and researchers. The purpose of this study was to determine whose explanations, professional athletes’ or medical professionals’, have a greater impact on college students’ knowledge and attitudes concerning concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). First, we gave a pre-test to measure students’ knowledge and attitudes about concussions and CTE. Students were then randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 watched a video of professional athletes describing their personal experience of concussions and providing information about CTE. Group 2 watched a video of medical professionals discussing concussions and CTE. Lastly, both groups completed a post-test parallel to the pre-test. We hypothesized that the personal testimonies of professional athletes would have a greater impact on attitudes about the seriousness of concussions and CTE; the medical professionals’ testimonies would have a greater impact on knowledge. The goal of the research was to increase participants’ knowledge and influence attitudes about the dangers of concussions and CTE. Ultimately, we hope awareness will continue to grow.

Start Date

25-4-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 9:45 AM

Faculty Advisor

Carolyn Hildebrandt

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 8:30 AM Apr 25th, 9:45 AM

Attitudes and Knowledge Concerning Concussions and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

Concussion and traumatic brain injury awareness has grown exponentially over the last few years through the testimonies of professional athletes, medical professionals, and researchers. The purpose of this study was to determine whose explanations, professional athletes’ or medical professionals’, have a greater impact on college students’ knowledge and attitudes concerning concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). First, we gave a pre-test to measure students’ knowledge and attitudes about concussions and CTE. Students were then randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 watched a video of professional athletes describing their personal experience of concussions and providing information about CTE. Group 2 watched a video of medical professionals discussing concussions and CTE. Lastly, both groups completed a post-test parallel to the pre-test. We hypothesized that the personal testimonies of professional athletes would have a greater impact on attitudes about the seriousness of concussions and CTE; the medical professionals’ testimonies would have a greater impact on knowledge. The goal of the research was to increase participants’ knowledge and influence attitudes about the dangers of concussions and CTE. Ultimately, we hope awareness will continue to grow.