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Title

Perspective-Taking as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Social Rejection and Altruism

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Ninety five students from the University of Groningen were randomly assigned to a condition in a 3 (essay conditions: social rejection, social acceptance, and misfortune control) X 2 (perspective-taking: high versus low) factorial design online study. Participants wrote an essay about an experience of a) being rejected; b) being accepted; or c) misfortune, and then indicated their willingness to help under four scenarios (helping in general, helping a rejected and stigmatized person, helping someone who can be seen as a potential acquaintance, and helping with the risk of negative evaluation) after reading (or not) perspective taking instructions. Results Across the four scenarios, participants in the rejection condition who read perspective-taking instructions showed a higher willingness to help than those in the rejection condition who did not read these instructions. There was not a consistent difference between perspective-taking conditions for those who wrote social acceptance or negative mood essays. Overall, perspectivetakers were more willing to help on two of the four scenarios. The effects were not caused by differences in mood or rejection sensitivity.

Start Date

25-4-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 2:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

Helen Harton

Comments

Moderator: Dr. Cindy Juby, Social Work

Location: Sabin Hall, Room 23

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Apr 25th, 1:30 PM Apr 25th, 2:30 PM

Perspective-Taking as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Social Rejection and Altruism

Ninety five students from the University of Groningen were randomly assigned to a condition in a 3 (essay conditions: social rejection, social acceptance, and misfortune control) X 2 (perspective-taking: high versus low) factorial design online study. Participants wrote an essay about an experience of a) being rejected; b) being accepted; or c) misfortune, and then indicated their willingness to help under four scenarios (helping in general, helping a rejected and stigmatized person, helping someone who can be seen as a potential acquaintance, and helping with the risk of negative evaluation) after reading (or not) perspective taking instructions. Results Across the four scenarios, participants in the rejection condition who read perspective-taking instructions showed a higher willingness to help than those in the rejection condition who did not read these instructions. There was not a consistent difference between perspective-taking conditions for those who wrote social acceptance or negative mood essays. Overall, perspectivetakers were more willing to help on two of the four scenarios. The effects were not caused by differences in mood or rejection sensitivity.