Complete Schedule

Title

Risk Factors of Sleep Quantity and Quality

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Prior research on sleep has revealed that 70 million Americans have some pattern of sleep disorders (CDC, 2013). There are many factors such as stress and negative cognitions that affect one’s ability to sleep. In the current study, we examined the role of emotion regulatory and health factors that would disrupt sleep patterns. Participants included 176 undergraduate students at a Midwestern University. The survey inquired about emotion regulatory factors (negative affect, suppression, and hostile attribution bias), overall health conditions (mental health and total health conditions), and the effect of these on sleep (sleep time, sleep quality, sleepiness, sleep-wake problems, and insomnia). Females were more likely to sleep for fewer hours and report poorer quality of sleep (insomnia and daytime sleepiness). Students with higher levels of negative emotions reported disrupted sleep (insomnia and daytime sleepiness), and fewer hours of sleep. Those with mental health conditions had disrupted sleep quantity and quality. Those who reported a higher number of physical health conditions were more likely to experience insomnia. Finally, individuals who reported a hostile attribution bias had greater sleep wake problems. The findings have implications for sleep disorder intervention programs that emphasize better emotion regulatory strategies and promote physical and mental health.

Start Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 1:15 PM

Faculty Advisor

Dilbur D. Arsiwalla

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:15 PM

Risk Factors of Sleep Quantity and Quality

Prior research on sleep has revealed that 70 million Americans have some pattern of sleep disorders (CDC, 2013). There are many factors such as stress and negative cognitions that affect one’s ability to sleep. In the current study, we examined the role of emotion regulatory and health factors that would disrupt sleep patterns. Participants included 176 undergraduate students at a Midwestern University. The survey inquired about emotion regulatory factors (negative affect, suppression, and hostile attribution bias), overall health conditions (mental health and total health conditions), and the effect of these on sleep (sleep time, sleep quality, sleepiness, sleep-wake problems, and insomnia). Females were more likely to sleep for fewer hours and report poorer quality of sleep (insomnia and daytime sleepiness). Students with higher levels of negative emotions reported disrupted sleep (insomnia and daytime sleepiness), and fewer hours of sleep. Those with mental health conditions had disrupted sleep quantity and quality. Those who reported a higher number of physical health conditions were more likely to experience insomnia. Finally, individuals who reported a hostile attribution bias had greater sleep wake problems. The findings have implications for sleep disorder intervention programs that emphasize better emotion regulatory strategies and promote physical and mental health.