Complete Schedule

Title

Variations in Using Motion and form Information in Biological Motion Perception Across Tasks and Facing

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

People with mental health issues often avoid treatment due to stigma associated with mental illness (Rusch, Angermeyer, & Corrigan, 2004). One common stereotype is that people with mental illnesses are violent and more likely to commit serious crimes (Fazel, Lichtenstein, Grann, Goodwin, & Langstrom 2010). Our research question was whether the opposite stereotype holds too—are those who commit violent crimes assumed to be mentally ill? 215 college students and 228 mTurkers read a “news article” describing a murder of a female college student. The articles manipulated the ethnicity of the suspect (name, stated ethnicity, and hometown) and method of death (gun vs. hand strangulation). Participants then rated how likely it was that the suspect was guilty and mentally ill and what a suggested sentence should be. Participants perceived shooters as more likely to be mentally ill and deserving of a lighter sentence than stranglers. White perpetrators were rated as more likely to be mentally ill than those of other races. Liberals agreed more than conservatives that if the perpetrator were mentally ill, he should receive a lighter sentence. People do seem to assume that at least some types of people who commit violent crimes are also mentally ill.

Start Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 1:15 PM

Faculty Advisor

Helen C. Harton

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:15 PM

Variations in Using Motion and form Information in Biological Motion Perception Across Tasks and Facing

People with mental health issues often avoid treatment due to stigma associated with mental illness (Rusch, Angermeyer, & Corrigan, 2004). One common stereotype is that people with mental illnesses are violent and more likely to commit serious crimes (Fazel, Lichtenstein, Grann, Goodwin, & Langstrom 2010). Our research question was whether the opposite stereotype holds too—are those who commit violent crimes assumed to be mentally ill? 215 college students and 228 mTurkers read a “news article” describing a murder of a female college student. The articles manipulated the ethnicity of the suspect (name, stated ethnicity, and hometown) and method of death (gun vs. hand strangulation). Participants then rated how likely it was that the suspect was guilty and mentally ill and what a suggested sentence should be. Participants perceived shooters as more likely to be mentally ill and deserving of a lighter sentence than stranglers. White perpetrators were rated as more likely to be mentally ill than those of other races. Liberals agreed more than conservatives that if the perpetrator were mentally ill, he should receive a lighter sentence. People do seem to assume that at least some types of people who commit violent crimes are also mentally ill.