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Title

Bedroom Video Games and Social Functioning in College

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Video games are a common form of entertainment, and are becoming more so. Half a billion people play video games at least an hour a day, and the average American young adult, by the time s/he turns 21, has spent as many hours gaming as s/he spent in every middle and high school class (McGonigal, 2010). With video games becoming such a pervasive part of life, it is important to consider their possible ramifications on behavior. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the presence of bedroom video games in high school and in college predicts certain aspects of social functioning in college. Over 530 students from a large Midwestern University participated in the study. The participants filled out three sets of surveys including the “Favorite Media Scale” and the “Social Interaction Survey.” We will use regression based analysis to examine the relationship between the presence of bedroom video games in high school and in college, prosocial behavior, physical aggression, and relational aggression.

Start Date

25-4-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2015 1:15 PM

Faculty Advisor

Douglas Gentile

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 1:15 PM

Bedroom Video Games and Social Functioning in College

Video games are a common form of entertainment, and are becoming more so. Half a billion people play video games at least an hour a day, and the average American young adult, by the time s/he turns 21, has spent as many hours gaming as s/he spent in every middle and high school class (McGonigal, 2010). With video games becoming such a pervasive part of life, it is important to consider their possible ramifications on behavior. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the presence of bedroom video games in high school and in college predicts certain aspects of social functioning in college. Over 530 students from a large Midwestern University participated in the study. The participants filled out three sets of surveys including the “Favorite Media Scale” and the “Social Interaction Survey.” We will use regression based analysis to examine the relationship between the presence of bedroom video games in high school and in college, prosocial behavior, physical aggression, and relational aggression.