Complete Schedule

Title

Gender and Driving Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This study aims to further examine the relationship between gender and driver behavior. It is well supported that males exhibit more aggressive behaviors than females in general (Hennessy & Wiesenthal, 2001). There is a fair amount of research looking at driver aggression and gender, but the previous conclusions reached are far from conclusive. Deffenbacher and colleagues (e.g., Deffenbacher, 2008) have found small but significant relations between gender and aggressive driving, other researchers (e.g., Wickens, Mann, Stoduto, Butter, Alomiteanu, & Smart, 2012) have not replicated this finding. A meta-analysis is being conducted to evaluate whether there are systematic gender differences in aggressive driving behavior. Data collection is ongoing at this point, such that trained coders are currently evaluating published articles to determine whether they fit the explicit criteria for inclusion in this project. Data presented will be in terms of preliminary findings. It is hypothesized that the final results of the meta-analysis will reveal a small effect size for the influence of gender on driving aggressive behavior. This study is also expected to reveal gender differences in how driver aggression is expressed.

Start Date

25-4-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 9:45 AM

Faculty Advisor

Sunde Nesbit

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

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Apr 25th, 8:30 AM Apr 25th, 9:45 AM

Gender and Driving Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

This study aims to further examine the relationship between gender and driver behavior. It is well supported that males exhibit more aggressive behaviors than females in general (Hennessy & Wiesenthal, 2001). There is a fair amount of research looking at driver aggression and gender, but the previous conclusions reached are far from conclusive. Deffenbacher and colleagues (e.g., Deffenbacher, 2008) have found small but significant relations between gender and aggressive driving, other researchers (e.g., Wickens, Mann, Stoduto, Butter, Alomiteanu, & Smart, 2012) have not replicated this finding. A meta-analysis is being conducted to evaluate whether there are systematic gender differences in aggressive driving behavior. Data collection is ongoing at this point, such that trained coders are currently evaluating published articles to determine whether they fit the explicit criteria for inclusion in this project. Data presented will be in terms of preliminary findings. It is hypothesized that the final results of the meta-analysis will reveal a small effect size for the influence of gender on driving aggressive behavior. This study is also expected to reveal gender differences in how driver aggression is expressed.