Complete Schedule

Title

ADHD-Related Impairment in College Students

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder of childhood, and for most individuals these symptoms and associated impairment persist into adolescence and adulthood. Research suggests that young adults with ADHD face additional challenges during the transition to college compared to their non-ADHD peers, including a greater risk for experiencing psychological distress, more difficulty with peer relationships, lower grades, and higher rates of dropout (Weyandt & DuPaul, 2013). The purpose of the current study is to better understand ADHD-related impairment in college students and to explore the impact of self-handicapping and stigma. Participant recruitment was completed in two phases. Participants in the first phase (n=36) all had a documented diagnosis of ADHD, and participants in the second phase (n=40) did not. Participants completed self-rating forms related to ADHD symptoms, functional impairment, self-handicapping, and either internalized stigma or outward ADHD stigma. Several t-tests were conducted to compare impairment across groups. As expected, impairment in all domains was significantly greater for individuals with ADHD. Individuals with ADHD also reported engaging in more self-handicapping behaviors. This may represent an important area that can be specifically targeted in interventions for college students with ADHD.

Start Date

25-4-2015 8:30 AM

End Date

25-4-2015 9:45 AM

Faculty Advisor

Elizabeth K. Lefler

Comments

Location: Great Reading Room, Seerley Hall

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 8:30 AM Apr 25th, 9:45 AM

ADHD-Related Impairment in College Students

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder of childhood, and for most individuals these symptoms and associated impairment persist into adolescence and adulthood. Research suggests that young adults with ADHD face additional challenges during the transition to college compared to their non-ADHD peers, including a greater risk for experiencing psychological distress, more difficulty with peer relationships, lower grades, and higher rates of dropout (Weyandt & DuPaul, 2013). The purpose of the current study is to better understand ADHD-related impairment in college students and to explore the impact of self-handicapping and stigma. Participant recruitment was completed in two phases. Participants in the first phase (n=36) all had a documented diagnosis of ADHD, and participants in the second phase (n=40) did not. Participants completed self-rating forms related to ADHD symptoms, functional impairment, self-handicapping, and either internalized stigma or outward ADHD stigma. Several t-tests were conducted to compare impairment across groups. As expected, impairment in all domains was significantly greater for individuals with ADHD. Individuals with ADHD also reported engaging in more self-handicapping behaviors. This may represent an important area that can be specifically targeted in interventions for college students with ADHD.