Complete Schedule

Presentation Type

Open Access Oral Presentation

Keywords

Chronic diseases--Government policy; County health services--Iowa;

Abstract

Problem: Most Iowans die from chronic diseases, or diseases developed over time, often influenced through behavioral choice. The top three, heart disease, cancer, and lower respiratory diseases account for over half of all death in Iowa and in the nation. However, most public health funding focuses on infectious disease and treatment, leaving little or nothing for primary prevention of chronic diseases.

Method: The 2014 Local Governmental Public Health Survey, annual reports, and Health Improvement projects were analyzed for primary prevention of chronic diseases at county health departments. This was compared to a review of federal and state funding for chronic disease prevention.

Results: Most county health departments allocate few, if any, resources to addressing the risk factors for the leading causes of death.

Conclusions: The cause of this is mostly institutional. The federal government allocates little funding for chronic disease prevention to the state, which then has little to give county health departments. Historically, local health departments focus more on infectious disease and filling gaps in health care services. Finally, there is little demand from the public for chronic disease prevention.

Start Date

4-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2017 4:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

Michele Devlin

Department

School of Kinesiology, Allied Health, and Human Services

Department

Division of Health Promotion and Education

Comments

Location: Maucker Union Elm Room

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

4-4-2017

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Apr 4th, 1:00 PM Apr 4th, 4:30 PM

Misplaced Priorities: How County Health Departments Overlook the Leading Causes of Death

Problem: Most Iowans die from chronic diseases, or diseases developed over time, often influenced through behavioral choice. The top three, heart disease, cancer, and lower respiratory diseases account for over half of all death in Iowa and in the nation. However, most public health funding focuses on infectious disease and treatment, leaving little or nothing for primary prevention of chronic diseases.

Method: The 2014 Local Governmental Public Health Survey, annual reports, and Health Improvement projects were analyzed for primary prevention of chronic diseases at county health departments. This was compared to a review of federal and state funding for chronic disease prevention.

Results: Most county health departments allocate few, if any, resources to addressing the risk factors for the leading causes of death.

Conclusions: The cause of this is mostly institutional. The federal government allocates little funding for chronic disease prevention to the state, which then has little to give county health departments. Historically, local health departments focus more on infectious disease and filling gaps in health care services. Finally, there is little demand from the public for chronic disease prevention.