Complete Schedule

Title

Influence of Study Abroad on Students’ Cultural Attitudes

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Keywords

Foreign study--Psychological aspects; College students--Attitudes;

Abstract

Intercultural contact is an integral part of 21st century life. One way of introducing intercultural contact is by encouraging students to study abroad. While study abroad is associated with linguistic (Carlson et al., 1990), personal (Ryan & Twibell, 2000), and professional gains (Dwyer, 2004), the current study, based on the premises of the contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954), investigated whether studying abroad and living with host families while studying abroad, influenced intercultural attitudes as measured by the Global Perspective Inventory (GPI; Braskamp, 2008). Archival data from 1007 students (769: Pre-test & 238: Post-test) who studied abroad from 2009-2014 indicated that studying abroad was associated with greater openness to individuals from diverse cultures, F(1, 973) = 30.323, p < .001, η2 = .030, and more diversity in interpersonal relationships F(1, 973) = 30.555, p < .001, η2 = .030 after students returned. Students who lived with host families reported having more diversity (M=3.86) in interpersonal relationships after they returned than students who did not live with host families (M= 3.65), F(1, 219) = 8.760, p = .003, η2 = .03. Studying abroad and living with host families may help improve intergroup relations. Universities and colleges should continue to encourage and enable students to study abroad. The study also provided support for the contact hypothesis and extended the application of contact hypothesis to study abroad and naturalistic settings.

Start Date

4-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2017 4:30 PM

Faculty Advisor

Helen Harton

Department

Department of Psychology

Comments

Location: Maucker Union Oak Room

Embargo Date

4-4-2017

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 4th, 1:00 PM Apr 4th, 4:30 PM

Influence of Study Abroad on Students’ Cultural Attitudes

Intercultural contact is an integral part of 21st century life. One way of introducing intercultural contact is by encouraging students to study abroad. While study abroad is associated with linguistic (Carlson et al., 1990), personal (Ryan & Twibell, 2000), and professional gains (Dwyer, 2004), the current study, based on the premises of the contact hypothesis (Allport, 1954), investigated whether studying abroad and living with host families while studying abroad, influenced intercultural attitudes as measured by the Global Perspective Inventory (GPI; Braskamp, 2008). Archival data from 1007 students (769: Pre-test & 238: Post-test) who studied abroad from 2009-2014 indicated that studying abroad was associated with greater openness to individuals from diverse cultures, F(1, 973) = 30.323, p < .001, η2 = .030, and more diversity in interpersonal relationships F(1, 973) = 30.555, p < .001, η2 = .030 after students returned. Students who lived with host families reported having more diversity (M=3.86) in interpersonal relationships after they returned than students who did not live with host families (M= 3.65), F(1, 219) = 8.760, p = .003, η2 = .03. Studying abroad and living with host families may help improve intergroup relations. Universities and colleges should continue to encourage and enable students to study abroad. The study also provided support for the contact hypothesis and extended the application of contact hypothesis to study abroad and naturalistic settings.