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Presentation Type

Open Access Oral Presentation

Keywords

Behavior disorders in children; Learning disabled children--Identification;

Abstract

Children with Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) are characterized by a hypoactive, sluggish behavior pattern that does not fully fit the conceptualization of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as was previously believed. Interest in this topic has surged recently, perhaps due to the fact that many researchers now view SCT as a construct that exists outside of ADHD (Barkley, 2014). SCT is associated with unique etiology, impairment, and comorbidities. Unlike ADHD, SCT represents a more passive form of inattention that may not disrupt the classroom. Thus, SCT may go unnoticed despite the fact that it is related to many academic and social difficulties (Becker & Langberg, 2013), and that early identification and intervention are crucial for the child’s success. The current study examined pre-service teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of SCT compared to two more well-known childhood disorders. Specifically, 161 Elementary Education majors read vignettes describing three fictitious boys presenting with symptoms of SCT, a common externalizing disorder (ADHD), and a common internalizing disorder (Social Phobia; SP), and rated each of the three vignettes in terms of their concern for the boy described. Results indicate that participants viewed all three disorders as concerning, but viewed the ADHD and SCT behaviors as the most problematic. However, participants indicated they would be the most likely to refer the child with SP to a school psychologist. Participants also had the most favorable attitudes toward working with the child with SP. Results highlight the need to better educate pre-service teachers about mental health problems in the classroom.

Start Date

1-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

1-4-2015 4:00 PM

Faculty Advisor

Elizabeth Lefler

Department

Department of Psychology

File Format

application/pdf

Embargo Date

3-15-2015

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Apr 1st, 2:00 PM Apr 1st, 4:00 PM

Identification of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo by Teachers

Children with Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) are characterized by a hypoactive, sluggish behavior pattern that does not fully fit the conceptualization of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as was previously believed. Interest in this topic has surged recently, perhaps due to the fact that many researchers now view SCT as a construct that exists outside of ADHD (Barkley, 2014). SCT is associated with unique etiology, impairment, and comorbidities. Unlike ADHD, SCT represents a more passive form of inattention that may not disrupt the classroom. Thus, SCT may go unnoticed despite the fact that it is related to many academic and social difficulties (Becker & Langberg, 2013), and that early identification and intervention are crucial for the child’s success. The current study examined pre-service teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of SCT compared to two more well-known childhood disorders. Specifically, 161 Elementary Education majors read vignettes describing three fictitious boys presenting with symptoms of SCT, a common externalizing disorder (ADHD), and a common internalizing disorder (Social Phobia; SP), and rated each of the three vignettes in terms of their concern for the boy described. Results indicate that participants viewed all three disorders as concerning, but viewed the ADHD and SCT behaviors as the most problematic. However, participants indicated they would be the most likely to refer the child with SP to a school psychologist. Participants also had the most favorable attitudes toward working with the child with SP. Results highlight the need to better educate pre-service teachers about mental health problems in the classroom.